The Rhine Dragon | Mobile Search Sitemap | Flag Germany Flag France Flag Spain

Local trees

Elder
Elder
Norway maple in autumn
Norway maple in autumn
Ripuarian trees
Ripuarian trees
Pappel
Cottonwood
Hornbeam
Hornbeam
Chestnut
Chestnut
Linde
Lime
Sycamore maple
Sycamore maple
Elm
Elm
Spruce
Spruce
Field maple
Field maple
Pedunculate oak
Pedunculate oak
Larch
Larch
Birke
Birch
Silver fir
Silver fir
Beech
Beech
Willow
Willow
Pine
Pine
Espe
Aspen
Naturwaldzelle
Forest left untouched

If the Seven Mountains were untouched nature, most likely the beeches would be predominant in the woods. Today, forestry has created mixed woods with 36% beeches, 18% oaks, 12% other deciduous trees, 3% robinias, 23% spruces and 8 % pines (source lanuv, North Rhine-Westphalia). On this page, you can see some of our local trees, but by far not all.

Where what kind of tree grows best depends on several factors, e.g. the soil conditions, height, proximity to water and others. In regions above 150 m, common oaks and hornbeam forests grow with many winter lime trees; in regions above 300 m, mountain oaks, beeches and European beeches. Also the maple tree belongs into the Seven Mountains Nature Park. The larch is actually a tree accustomed to much higher locations, their home are the high mountains, but now we find the larches also in lower regions.

On this page. you see some of our local trees that love a location close to the water. Today, most areas along the Rhine are land developed and cultivated by man, that means settlements designed by humans with promenades, shoreline parks, fields and meadows and more. Only a few remnants of the original riverside woodlands have remained, so on the Rhine island of Nonnenwerth or at the mouth of the rivers Ahr and the Sieg into the Rhine.

References

The photos "spruce" and "silver fir" are from the German Wikipedia, public domain section.