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Trachyte, latite and basalt - volcanic rocks from the Siebengebirge

  • Basalt from the Mount Petersberg, Siebengebirge
  • Trachyte from Mount Drachenfels, Siebengebirge
  • Latite from Mount Stenzelberg, Siebengebirge
  • Quarzite from the Siebengebirge
  • Buchenplatz, Siebengebirge
Basalt from the Mount Petersberg, Siebengebirge Trachyte from Mount Drachenfels, Siebengebirge Latite from Mount Stenzelberg, Siebengebirge Quarzite from the Siebengebirge Buchenplatz, Siebengebirge

If you walk along the Ölberg trail, you will come to the Buchenplatz. Here you can get some rock types from the Seven Mountains, About 30 million years ago, in the Oligocene, there was volcanic activity in the region of the Seven Mountains. Three times large volcanic eruptions occurred, with the lava rolling, overlapping, cooling and creating hills, that were then shaped over the millenniums by the wind and weather into the landscape we see today. With the final volcanic eruption the Petersberg came into being (basalt).

Besides the ancient slate, as a result of these three large eruptions, there were three now newer types of rock, sorted by age: trachyte (Drachenfels), latite (Wolkenburg, Stenzelberg) and basalt (Ölberg, Petersberg).

In the Nature Park House at Margarethenhöhe, you can learn a lot more about rocks, volcanism in the Seven Mountains and petrology.

But the history of the Seven Mountains is also a history of the quarries. Large parts of the Cologne Cathedral were built with Drachenfels trachyte. The latite of the Wolkenburg was used for the facades of Baroque palaces, that of Stenzelberg for the construction of the Abbey Church of Heisterbach. Since the time of Napoleon, basalt was used to constructs roads and railroads, and finally the Prussians used it to build their fortifications.